Our Imaging Services


Best Value for Diagnostic Imaging in North Texas


1. Eclipse Imaging is a non-hospital affiliated facility.

Why do I need to know this? Hospitals & hospital affiliated imaging facilities charge up to 5 times what Eclipse charges!

2. Eclipse Imaging is in-network with most insurance providers.

How does this benefit me? What you spend will go towards your deductible, so you end up paying less!

3. Eclipse Imaging's equipment is ACR accredited.

What does this mean? ACR stands for American College of Radiology, all of our equipment goes through rigorous quality testing by ACR. Unlike many low cost imaging providers, you will receive a quality diagnostic study.

4. Eclipse provides in-house, no interest, no credit check financing for cash paying customers and customers with high deductibles.

Why? Health care and insurance have become extremely expense and deductibles have skyrocketed. While many other Imaging Centers are joining up with hospitals & increasing their prices, Eclipse wants to give our community an affordable option with quality results that are acceptable to your doctor. Don't delay your medical care because of the price.

5. Very competitive cash prices.

Call or email for exact pricing and payment plan details!

Grapevine Location


  • Open MRI

    Open MRI scanners have a wide, non-constricting space, making Open MRI an acceptable alternative for patients who are severely claustrophobic or large. An open MRI scan takes approximately 45-60 minutes. The technologist will help you lie down on a cushioned table and an imaging device called a "coil" will be placed around the area of the body being scanned. The coil looks similar to a large soft belt. When you are comfortably positioned, the table will move into the magnet opening. As the exam proceeds, you will hear a muffled thumping sound for several minutes at a time as the images are taken. It is important to lie as still as possible during this part of the exam. The resulting images will be reviewed and interpreted by a radiologist and a report will be sent to your doctor. Because of the magnetic field, remove any metallic objects such as jewelry, watches, and hairpins. Inform the technologist of prior surgeries or metal implants such as pacemakers or aneurysm clips.
  • Computed Tomography (CT)

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanning is a rapid, painless diagnostic examination that combines
    x-rays and computers. A CT scan allows the radiologist to see the location, nature, and extent of
    many different diseases or abnormalities inside your body. Multiple low-dose X-rays are taken in
    sequence by a rotating X-ray tube. All you need to do is lie still on a table for approximately 10-
    30 minutes. The table top will move you through a gantry (shaped like a big donut) which houses
    the X-ray tube and a set of detectors. Images are acquired by detectors that pick-up the x-ray that
    passes through your body. The computer processes this information to form an image that the
    radiologist will review and interpret. Some CT studies require a contrast agent to enhance the
    pictures that are taken of your body. You will receive special instructions if your exam requires
    you to consume an oral contrast agent (barium sulphate) in advance.
  • Bone Density / Dexa

    In the examination, which measures bone density in the hip and spine, the patient lies on a padded table. An x-ray generator is located below the patient and an imaging device, or detector, is positioned above. To assess the spine, the patient's legs are supported on a padded box to flatten the pelvis and lower (lumbar) spine. To assess the hip, the patient's foot is placed in a brace that rotates the hip inward. In both cases, the detector is slowly passed over the area, generating images on a computer monitor. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. The technologist will walk behind a wall or into the next room to activate the x-ray machine. The peripheral tests are simpler. The finger, hand, forearm or foot is placed in a small device that obtains a bone density reading within a few minutes.
  • X-Ray

    The technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the proper position. A lead apron may be placed over your pelvic area or breasts when feasible to protect from radiation. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. The technologist will walk behind a wall or into the next room to activate the x-ray machine. You may be repositioned for another view and the process is repeated. Two or three images (from different angles) will typically be taken around a joint (knee, elbow or wrist). When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. A bone x-ray examination is usually completed within five to 10 minutes.
  • Electromyogram (EMG) / Nerve Conduction Studies (NCV)

    Electromyogram
    The skin over the areas to be tested is cleaned. A needle electrode that is attached by wires to a recording machine is inserted into a muscle. When the electrodes are in place, the electrical activity in that muscle is recorded while the muscle is at rest. Then the technologist or doctor asks you to tighten (contract) the muscle slowly and steadily. This electrical activity is recorded. The electrode may be moved a number of times to record the activity in different areas of the muscle or in different muscles. An EMG may take 30 to 60 minutes. When the test is done, the electrodes are removed and those areas of the skin where a needle was inserted are cleaned.

    Nerve Conduction Studies
    In this test, several flat metal disc electrodes are attached to your skin with tape or a paste. A shock-emitting electrode is placed directly over the nerve, and a recording electrode is placed over the muscles controlled by that nerve. Several quick electrical pulses are given to the nerve, and the time it takes for the muscle to contract in response to the electrical pulse is recorded. The speed of the response is called the conduction velocity.The same nerves on the other side of the body may be studied for comparison. When the test is done, the electrodes are removed. Nerve conduction studies are done before an EMG if both tests are being done. Nerve conduction tests may take from 15 minutes to 1 hour or more, depending on how many nerves and muscles are studied.
  • PCE/FCE

    FCE:
    Why order a FCE…Get The Facts!
    • Quantify/Evaluate work tolerance and the necessity for work restrictions.
    • Transition injured workers from disability to function and employment.

    What will a FCE Test measure?
    • Stamina
    • Tolerance to functional activities including lifting and carrying
    • Physical Strength and Abilities
    • Reliability of reports of pain and limitation
    • Range of Motion (ROM) measurement and documentation for spine, extremities, joints, or hand/fingers
    • Large muscle groups, grip strength, pinch strength, pressure threshold, pressure tolerance, niosh static
    lift, or static push/pull.

    PCE:
    Why order a PCE…Get The Facts!
    • Provide Objective Findings to qualify coverage of further care and treatments. What will a PCE Test measure?
    • About 75% of measurements that an FCE measures…without all of the Back-To-Work Paperwork!
  • Digital Ultrasound

    For most ultrasound exams, the patient is positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted or moved. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that can block the sound waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then presses the transducer firmly against the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a farther location to see an area of concern better. Doppler sonography is performed using the same transducer. When the examination is complete, the patient may be asked to dress and wait while the ultrasound images are reviewed. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and inserted into a natural opening in the body.
  • Digital Mammography

    During mammography, a specially qualified radiologic technologist will position your breast in the mammography unit. Your breast will be placed on a special platform and compressed with a paddle (often made of clear Plexiglas or other plastic). The technologist will gradually compress your breast. You will be asked to change positions between images. The routine views are a top-to-bottom view and an angled side view. The process will be repeated for the other breast. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. The examination process should take about 30 minutes.
  • Pain Management

  • Fluoroscopy

    Fluoroscopy procedures require significant preparation. Some procedures include UGI, IVP, HSG, Barium Swallow, and Barium Swallow with tablet. Each of these tests requires the patient be scheduled in a particular manner and undergo a special pre-procedure preparation. These details will be discussed with you at the time you schedule your test.

    All x-rays and fluoroscopy procedures are performed by registered x-ray technologists and are interpreted by Board Certified Radiologists.
  • Hysterosalpingogram (HSG)

    The procedure is like a gynecological exam. The patient is positioned on her back on the exam table, with her knees bent or her feet held up with stirrups and a speculum is inserted into the vagina. The cervix is then cleansed, and a catheter is inserted into the cervix. The speculum is removed and the patient is carefully positioned underneath the fluoroscopy camera. The contrast material then begins to fill the uterine cavity, fallopian tubes and peritoneal cavity through the catheter and fluoroscopic images are taken. In some cases, if certain abnormalities are encountered, the patient will be asked to rest and wait up to 30 minutes so that a delayed image can be obtained. This delayed image may provide clues to a patient's condition that the original images with contrast material do not When the procedure is complete, the catheter will be removed and the patient will be allowed to sit up. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. The hysterosalpingogram is usually completed within 30 minutes.
  • Upper GI (UGI)

    A radiologic technologist and a radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, guide the patient through the upper GI series. As the patient drinks the liquid barium, which resembles a light-colored milkshake, the radiologist will watch the barium pass through the patient's digestive tract on a fluoroscope, a device that projects radiographic images in a movie-like sequence onto a monitor. The exam table will be positioned at different angles and the patient's abdomen may be compressed to help spread the barium. Once the upper GI tract is adequately coated with the barium, still x-ray images will be taken and stored for further review. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. This exam is usually completed within 20 minutes.
  • IVP

    The patient is positioned on the table and still x-ray images are taken. The contrast material is then injected, usually in a vein in the patient's arm, followed by additional still images. The number of images taken depends on the reason for the examination and the patient's anatomy. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. The technologist will walk behind a wall or into the next room to activate the x-ray machine. As the contrast material is processed by the kidneys, a series of images is taken to determine the actual size of the kidneys and to capture the urinary tract in action as it begins to empty. The technologist may apply a compression band around the body to better visualize the urinary structures leading from the kidney. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. An IVP study is usually completed within an hour. However, because some kidneys function at a slower rate, the exam may last up to four hours.
  • Barium Swallow

    A radiologic technologist and a radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, guide the patient through the upper GI series. As the patient drinks the liquid barium, which resembles a light-colored milkshake, the radiologist will watch the barium pass through the patient's digestive tract on a fluoroscope, a device that projects radiographic images in a movie-like sequence onto a monitor. The exam table will be positioned at different angles and the patient's abdomen may be compressed to help spread the barium. Once the upper GI tract is adequately coated with the barium, still x-ray images will be taken and stored for further review. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. This exam is usually completed within 20 minutes.
  • Barium Swallow with Tablet

    A radiologic technologist and a radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, guide the patient through the upper GI series. As the patient drinks the liquid barium, which resembles a light-colored milkshake, the radiologist will watch the barium pass through the patient's digestive tract on a fluoroscope, a device that projects radiographic images in a movie-like sequence onto a monitor. The exam table will be positioned at different angles and the patient's abdomen may be compressed to help spread the barium. Once the upper GI tract is adequately coated with the barium, still x-ray images will be taken and stored for further review. When the examination is complete, you will be asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. This exam is usually completed within 20 minutes.

North Richland Hills Location

  • 1.5T High-Field MRI

    An MRI scan takes approximately 45-60 minutes. The technologist will help you lie down on a cushioned table and an imaging device called a "coil" will be placed around the area of the body being scanned. The coil looks similar to a large soft belt. When you are comfortably positioned, the table will move into the magnet opening. As the exam proceeds, you will hear a muffled thumping sound for several minutes at a time as the images are taken. It is important to lie as still as possible during this part of the exam. The resulting images will be reviewed and interpreted by a radiologist and a report will be sent to your doctor. Because of the magnetic field, remove any metallic objects such as jewelry, watches, and hairpins. Inform the technologist of prior surgeries or metal implants such as pacemakers or aneurysm clips.
  • Computed Tomography (CT)

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanning is a rapid, painless diagnostic examination that combines x-rays and computers. A CT scan allows the radiologist to see the location, nature, and extent of many different diseases or abnormalities inside your body. Multiple low-dose X-rays are taken in sequence by a rotating X-ray tube. All you need to do is lie still on a table for approximately 10-30 minutes. The table top will move you through a gantry (shaped like a big donut) which houses the X-ray tube and a set of detectors. Images are acquired by detectors that pick-up the x-ray that passes through your body. The computer processes this information to form an image that the radiologist will review and interpret. Some CT studies require a contrast agent to enhance the pictures that are taken of your body. You will receive special instructions if your exam requires you to consume an oral contrast agent (barium sulphate) in advance.
  • Digital Ultrasound

    For most ultrasound exams, the patient is positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted or moved. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that can block the sound waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then presses the transducer firmly against the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a farther location to see an area of concern better. Doppler sonography is performed using the same transducer. When the examination is complete, the patient may be asked to dress and wait while the ultrasound images are reviewed. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and inserted into a natural opening in the body.
  • Electromyogram (EMG) / Nerve Conduction Studies (NCV)

    Electromyogram
    The skin over the areas to be tested is cleaned. A needle electrode that is attached by wires to a recording machine is inserted into a muscle. When the electrodes are in place, the electrical activity in that muscle is recorded while the muscle is at rest. Then the technologist or doctor asks you to tighten (contract) the muscle slowly and steadily. This electrical activity is recorded. The electrode may be moved a number of times to record the activity in different areas of the muscle or in different muscles. An EMG may take 30 to 60 minutes. When the test is done, the electrodes are removed and those areas of the skin where a needle was inserted are cleaned.
  • PCE/FCE

    FCE:
    Why order a FCE…Get The Facts!
    • Quantify/Evaluate work tolerance and the necessity for work restrictions.
    • Transition injured workers from disability to function and employment.

    What will a FCE Test measure?
    • Stamina
    • Tolerance to functional activities including lifting and carrying
    • Physical Strength and Abilities
    • Reliability of reports of pain and limitation
    • Range of Motion (ROM) measurement and documentation for spine, extremities, joints, or hand/fingers
    • Large muscle groups, grip strength, pinch strength, pressure threshold, pressure tolerance, niosh static
    lift, or static push/pull.

    PCE:
    Why order a PCE…Get The Facts!
    • Provide Objective Findings to qualify coverage of further care and treatments. What will a PCE Test measure?
    • About 75% of measurements that an FCE measures…without all of the Back-To-Work Paperwork!